FANDOM


THURSDAY 19 October
PLENARY: 09:00 - 10:30

OPENING & WELCOME

Jeff Skinner, President ASTP, Welcome, Opening
Jean-Pierre Mascarelli, Local counsellor, President of the committee for economy, tourism, and clusters of local government, Team Côte D'Azur, Welcome
Frederic Caillaud, Director Licensing and Business Development L'Oréal & President LES France, Trends in Licensing in the Industry: Evolution or revolution

PARALLEL : 11:00 - 12:30

LICENSING: PREPARING FOR THE BIG DEAL
Case Study I: Applications & Market

NON-TRADITIONAL TECH TRANSFER
Use your researcher more actively!

KEY LEARNING POINTS IN REAL LIFE TT
Inventors and ownership

You receive a disclosure for a apparently promising invention - your task (in teams) is to identify and report back on the best application for the technology and to assess market potential.

Søren Peter Olesen, Panum Institute, Copenhagen University, Denmark

Thomas Baaken, Science-to-Business Marketing Research Centre, University of Applied Sciences, Munster, Germany

Inventors are sometimes very effective at taking the lead in commercialising their own inventions. They can be highly effective. We learn from an academic who did so and explore the advantages and pitfalls of mobilising and supporting inventors who take on this role.

Koen Verhoef, Technology Transfer Manager VU University and Medical Centre, the Netherlands

Alain Roman, Contracts and Licenses Director , L'Oréal R&D, France

Establishing inventorship may seem straightforward but it often isn’t – and TTO’s can meet with resistance when they try to establish who contributed to an invention and who may part-own it. Yet it is essential to find out prior to licensing. Here we draw on the experiences of a TT manager and understand the position of industry when they in-license IP.


12.30 - 14.00 LUNCH, PARALLEL: 14:00 - 15:15

LICENSING: PREPARING FOR THE BIG DEAL
Case study II: Assessing technologies

NON-TRADITIONAL TECH TRANSFER
Licensing bits and pieces

KEY LEARNING POINTS IN REAL LIFE TT
Applications and markets

What are the criteria by which you assess the commercial potential and set the strategy for an invention? In this session we explore issues of market potential, timing, investment need, applications, markets, end users and ‘monetisation’ – all necessary steps when commercializing new technologies.

Steven Potter, Chair Executive Board of the R&D Society, United Kingdom

Jens Tampe, Key Account Manager Ascenion GmbH, Germany

Some inventions are too small to market by themselves - for example antibodies and software. How can we use external parties to bundle and consolidate such fragmented IP, thereby achieving economies of scale and commercializing technologies that may otherwise sub-critical? Is this ‘bundling’ best left to the private sector?


Karen Laigaard, Head Technology Transfer, University of Copenhagen, Denmark

Gavin Spencer, Licensing & Alliance Director, Nicox, France

TTO’s receive more disclosures than they can possibly handle – on the basis of very little (and usually optimistic) information you have to assess – under pressure - which to pursue and which to reject. How are these decisions made in practice? Based on members concrete experience we show how to identify applications and make realistic market estimates.


15.15 - 15.45 BREAK, PARALLEL: 15:45 - 17:00

LICENSING: PREPARING FOR THE BIG DEAL
Case Study III: Commercialisation strategy

NON-TRADITIONAL TECH TRANSFER
Collaboration-led licensing

KEY LEARNING POINTS IN REAL LIFE TT
Valuation & deal structure

We resume the case study – working in teams to propose a commercial strategy for the invention and to develop an implementation plan.

Eli Keshavarz-Moore, Senior Lecturer of Biochemical Engineering University College London, United Kingdom

Andre Clerix, IP Manager IMEC, Belgium

A major difficulty we have in TT is persuading potential licensees that a technology could be valuable to them. We tend to do this by providing ever more marketing and technical information. In this session we see an entirely different way of engaging with licensees – where applied research collaborations are used as a way of engaging with companies – who take licenses to the background, foreground (or both) once they recognize its value.


Clotilde Turleque, Director Technology Transfer and Commercialisation CEA, France

Jeff Skinner, Director for Enterprise Partnerships, Unversity College London, United Kingdom

One of the perennial problems facing any TTO is the valuing technologies and devising a deal structure that provides the right incentives and fair return to the parties. Based on members concrete experience we illustrate how these issues are resolved in practice.


FRIDAY 20 October
PLENARY: 09:00 - 10:30

OPENING SESSION

John Tyler,General Counsel, Ewing Marion Kaufmann Foundation USA, Universities you can do business with (and those you can’t)

10.30 - 11.00 BREAK, PARALLEL: 11:00 - 12:30

LICENSING: PREPARING FOR THE BIG DEAL
Case Study IV: Negotiation Strategy

NON-TRADITIONAL TECH TRANSFER
Engaging in business oriented activities

KEY LEARNING POINTS IN REAL LIFE TT
Negotiations and closure

Having made contact to potential buyers, how do you see your negotiation & deal strategy? How do you actually make first contact to customers and get their attention? Which deal strategy do you choose, and how do you successfully negotiate it? We discuss different strategies and find one for our case – in preparation for an actual negotiation.


Carsten Skamris, CEO Blade Test Centre A/S, Denmark

Gerardo Turcatti, Director Biomolecular Screening Facility, Ecole Polytechnique Federale Lausanne, Switzerland

When thinking about commercialisation strategies we tend to think in terms of ‘licensing’ or ‘spin-outs’. Both suffer the structural disadvantage of being quite arm’s mechanisms that can inhibit transfer of know-how. Here we look at two more collaborative and effective ways of commercialisation – via joint ventures and high-technology platforms.


Simon Youlton, Senior Manager Cancer Research Technology Ltd, United Kingdom

Jörn Erselius, Managing Director Garching Innovations, Germany

TTO’s often find it difficult to visualise the negotiation process and to move from the ‘selling’ phase to commitment, negotiation and close. In this session we follow two difficult (but ultimately successful) negotiations, identifying critical issues and understanding the TTO’s role in closing the deal


12.30 - 14.00 LUNCH, PARALLEL: 14:00 - 15:15

LICENSING: PREPARING FOR THE BIG DEAL
Case study V: Negotiating & closing the deal

NON-TRADITIONAL TECH TRANSFER
Market / problem driven innovation

KEY LEARNING POINTS IN REAL LIFE TT
Post deal management

A team of TTO people from university will be up against an experienced LES-negotiator from industry.

Patrick Chaltin, IP Officer, KU Leuven, Belgium

External Investor

Universities face specific challenges when exploiting biomedical research and drug related inventions - technology transfer in this area has changed dramatically in the last few years. Together with an external investor, a centre for drug design and discovery is being created at the KU Leuven to pro-actively enhance technology transfer in this field.

Chris De Jonghe, Licensing Manager VIB, Belgium

Chris de Bruyne, Director Licensing & Business Development Galderma, France

Based on members concrete experience we show that we cannot relax because a deal has been closed. There is a lot of work in the implementation – ensuring that the licensee is commercializing the technology and paying those royalties. What do you do when your licensee loses interest?


15.15 - 15.30 BREAK, PLENARY: 15.30 - 16:45

FINAL SESSION : FINAL PLENARY

Teams involved in the first track – where they have taken a technology from disclosure to deal – describe which parts they found the most challenging and surprising. We discuss where TTO’s can work alone, when it is more effective to work in teams and where TTO’s need the most support and mentoring from their managers.

Ad blocker interference detected!


Wikia is a free-to-use site that makes money from advertising. We have a modified experience for viewers using ad blockers

Wikia is not accessible if you’ve made further modifications. Remove the custom ad blocker rule(s) and the page will load as expected.